Heads Up Helmets uses the Sani Sport system for sanitizing every piece of equipment that we recertify. Sani Sport is the most efficient process for significantly reducing bacteria in protective gear and athletic equipment. The Sani Sport equipment cleaning technology is used by the NHL, NFL, CFL and Major League Baseball for their equipment cleaning needs and is the newest and best technology on the market. Sani Sport significantly reduces harmful bacteria, including anti-biotic resistant superbug MRSA. The Sani Sport system can be used not only for helmets and shoulder pads, but for cleats, other footwear, military and law enforcement tactical gear, boxing gloves, baseball gloves, and practically any other equipment that is in need of sanitization.

The Science of Common Sense

  • Sani Sport is the most widely used bacteria & odor reduction system in the sports world
  • Used by over 125 professional sports teams
  • Used by the Canadian Armed Forces, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Police Forces & Correctional Facilities
  • Safe for all equipment including gas masks, helmets, leather gloves, protective gear and riot equipment

Who uses the Sani Sport system?

Sani Sport Lab Results

MRSA In The Media

How USC football tackled MRSA (PDF)

Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team

Professional Sports Prepare Game Plans for MRSA Superbug

– The Deadly Bug Stalking Athletes

A Menace in the Locker Room

– This is a Staph Infection

The Killer in the Locker Room

‘Superbug’ MRSA Worries Doctors, Athletes

– MRSA and sports camps: Protect your youth athlete

– Louisiana Office of Public Health Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section

– USA Wrestling: MRSA and Other Infection Facts

Preventing Staph Infections in Contact Sports

Athletes Affected by MRSA and Infectious Bacteria

“In each of the last three years, more MRSA-infected people have checked into the hospital than either HIVpositive or influenza-afflicted patients, combined”
Fung, Brian. “MRSA on the Rise: Infections Have Doubled in 5 Years.”

 

The Atlantic. N.p., 30 July 2012. Web. 03 Aug. 2012.
<http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/07/mrsa-on-the-rise-infections-have-doubled-in-5-years/260495/>.

“A USA TODAY investigation shows that C. diff is far more prevalent than federal reports suggest. The bacteria is linked in hospital records to more than
30,000 deaths a year in the United States— about twice federal estimates and rivaling the 32,000 killed in traffic accidents. It strikes about a half-million
Americans a year.”
Eisler, Peter. “Far More Could Be Done to Stop the Deadly Bacteria C. Diff.” USA Today. Gannett, 16 Aug. 2012. Web. 27 Aug. 2012.
<http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-08-16/deadly-bacteria-hospital-infections/57079514/1>.